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dc.contributor.authorDyson, Simonen
dc.contributor.authorAtkin, Karlen
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-02T09:59:34Z
dc.date.available2013-12-02T09:59:34Z
dc.date.issued2013-11-26
dc.identifier.citationDyson, S.M. and Atkin, K (2013) Achieve equity in access to sickle cell services. Health Services Journal 26th November 2013en
dc.identifier.issn0952-2271
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2086/9490
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.hsj.co.uk/home/commissioning/achieve-equity-in-access-to-sickle-cell-services/5065176.article#.UpxZdiaYaUk
dc.description.abstractGreater priority, and appropriate resources, need to be accorded to the provision of sickle cell and thalassaemia services. Sickle cell and thalassaemia disorders are among the most common genetic conditions in the world. In the UK, the condition affects about 15,000 people of all ethnic backgrounds but is more common in people of black African or African-Caribbean, Mediterranean and Asian origin. There are encouraging moves towards networks of clinical care based around centres with medical and nursing staff with specialist knowledge. Yet legitimate questions remain about the lack of priority accorded to sickle cell and thalassaemia services.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEMAP Publishing Limiteden
dc.subjectsickle cellen
dc.subjectthalassaemiaen
dc.subjecthealth servicesen
dc.subjectequality and diversityen
dc.titleAchieve equity in access to sickle cell servicesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.researchgroupUnit for the Social Study of Thalassaemia and Sickle Cellen
dc.peerreviewedNoen
dc.explorer.multimediaNoen
dc.funderESRC (Economic and Social Research Council)en
dc.projectidERSC RES-062-23-3225en
dc.researchinstituteInstitute for Allied Health Sciences Researchen


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