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dc.contributor.authorDyson, Simon
dc.contributor.authorAtkin, Karl
dc.contributor.authorCulley, Lorraine
dc.contributor.authorDyson, Sue, 1960-
dc.contributor.authorEvans, Hala
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-08T10:23:34Z
dc.date.available2011-03-08T10:23:34Z
dc.date.issued2011-03-04
dc.identifier.citationDyson, S.M., Atkin, K., Culley, L.A., Dyson, S.E. and Evans, H. (2011) Sickle cell, habitual dyspositions and fragile dispositions: young people with sickle cell at school. Sociology of Health and Illness 33 (3) pp. 465-483en
dc.identifier.issn0141-9889
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2086/4706
dc.descriptionThis article is Open Access, and is available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-9566.2010.01301.x/abstracten
dc.description.abstractThe experiences of young people living with a sickle cell disorder in schools in England are reported through a thematic analysis of forty interviews, using Bourdieu’s notions of field, capital and habitus. Young people with sickle cell are found to be habitually dys-positioned between the demands of the clinic for health maintenance through self-care and the field of the school, with its emphases on routines, consistent attendance and contextual demands for active and passive pupil behaviour. The tactics or dispositions that young people living with sickle cell can then employ, during strategy and struggle at school, are therefore fragile: they work only contingently, transiently or have the unintended consequences of displacing other valued social relations. The dispositions of the young people with sickle cell are framed by other social struggles: innovations in school procedures merely address aspects of sickle cell in isolation and are not consolidated into comprehensive policies; mothers inform, liaise, negotiate and advocate in support of a child with sickle cell but with limited success. Reactions of teachers and peers to sickle cell have the enduring potential to drain the somatic, cultural and social capital of young people living with sickle cell.en
dc.description.sponsorshipEconomic and Social Research Council (Grant: RES-000-23-1486)en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.subjectsickle cellen
dc.subjectschool healthen
dc.subjectPierre Bourdieuen
dc.subjectfielden
dc.subjectcapitalen
dc.subjecthabitusen
dc.subjectchronic illnessen
dc.subjectsociologyen
dc.titleSickle cell, habitual dyspositions and fragile dispositions: young people with sickle cell at school.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9566.2010.01301.x
dc.researchgroupUnit for the Social Study of Thalassaemia and Sickle Cell
dc.researchgroupReproduction Research Group
dc.researchgroupMary Seacole Research Centre
dc.researchgroupNursing and Midwifery Research Centre
dc.researchgroupHealth Policy Research Unit
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.ref2014.selected1366719837_9110680002072_22_1
dc.researchinstituteInstitute for Allied Health Sciences Researchen
dc.researchinstituteCentre for Reproduction Research (CRR)en


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