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dc.contributor.authorDurose, Catherine
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-03T15:29:53Z
dc.date.available2010-11-03T15:29:53Z
dc.date.issued2009-03
dc.identifier.citationDurose, C. (2009) Front-line workers and 'local knowledge': neighbourhood stories in contemporary UK local governance. Public Administration, 87 (1), pp. 35-49.en
dc.identifier.issn0033-3298
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2086/4362
dc.description.abstractOne of the aims of this special issue is to `decentre' a key facet of governance, namely networks. This article considers in particular the concept `networked community governance', a key part of New Labour`s reforms in local governance and, in particular, around neighbourhood-based working. This article draws on interpretive methods and analysis to explore the everyday work of front-line workers in contemporary local governance through their own stories. The article is based on empirical work in the neighbourhood management system developed in Salford, a local authority in the North West of England. Key to facilitating `networked community governance', is front-line workers' own `local knowledge', understood as the mundane, yet expert, understanding front-line workers develop from their own contextual experiences. The article explores the difficulties that front-line workers perceive themselves to face in their everyday work and how they use their `local knowledge' to develop responsive, entrepreneurial strategies.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.titleFront-line workers and 'local knowledge': neighbourhood stories in contemporary UK local governance.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9299.2008.01737.X
dc.researchgroupLocal Governance Research Uniten


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