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dc.contributor.authorButler, Peter
dc.contributor.authorHammer, Anita
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-19T14:05:33Z
dc.date.available2020-05-19T14:05:33Z
dc.date.issued2020-04-16
dc.identifier.citationButler, P. and Hammer, A. (2020) HR practice in a fast food MNC: Exploring the low discretion, high commitment phenomenon. International Journal of Human Resource Management,en
dc.identifier.urihttps://dora.dmu.ac.uk/handle/2086/19614
dc.descriptionThe file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.en
dc.description.abstractThe UK’s widespread use of low-skill, low-paid employment has been well documented. It has been argued internal labour markets (ILMs) benefit such workers, affording them with opportunities for progression. Relatively little is known, however, about the impact of ILMs on entry level workers undertaking routinised service sector work. Drawing on qualitative data this article explores the prospects on offer in a market leading, fast food MNC. Potential enabling features include on the job training, a transparent and integrated pay structure and a professed culture of progression. Occupational movements to positions above the low-pay threshold are, however, relatively rare. We conjecture this contradiction is the result of the business context in which the firm operates. The findings suggest that in sectors where price leadership strategies dominate, escape from low-pay is likely to be exceptional, even within large organisations featuring some of the classic characteristics of ‘pure’ or strong ILMs.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen
dc.subjecthigh commitmenten
dc.titleHR practice in a fast food MNC: Exploring the low discretion, high commitment phenomenonen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1080/09585192.2020.1751239
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.funderNo external funderen
dc.cclicenceCC-BY-NCen
dc.date.acceptance2020-03-27
dc.researchinstitutePeople, Organisations and Work Institute (POWI)en


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