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dc.contributor.authorQutachi, Omar
dc.contributor.authorTanase, Constantin, Edi
dc.contributor.authorWhite, L.J.
dc.contributor.authorShakesheff, K.M.
dc.contributor.authorMcCaskie, Andrew, W
dc.contributor.authorBest, S.
dc.contributor.authorCameron, Ruth, E
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-14T11:37:01Z
dc.date.available2019-05-14T11:37:01Z
dc.date.issued2019-03-11
dc.identifier.citationTanase, C.E.,Quatachi, O., White, L.J., Shakesheff, K.M., McCaskie, A.W., Best, S.M., Cameron, R.E. (2019) Targeted protein delivery: carbodiimide crosslinking influences protein release from microparticles incorporated within collagen scaffolds. Regenerative Biomaterials, 2019, pp.1-9.en
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.dora.dmu.ac.uk/handle/2086/17809
dc.descriptionopen access articleen
dc.description.abstractTissue engineering response may be tailored via controlled, sustained release of active agents from protein-loaded degradable microparticles incorporated directly within three-dimensional (3D) ice-templated collagen scaffolds. However, the effects of covalent crosslinking during scaffold preparation on the availability and release of protein from the incorporated microparticles have not been explored. Here, we load 3D ice-templated collagen scaffolds with controlled additions of poly-(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles. We probe the effects of subsequent N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)- N0-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride crosslinking on protein release, using microparticles with different internal protein distributions. Fluorescein isothiocyanate labelled bovine serum albumin is used as a model protein drug. The scaffolds display a homogeneous microparticle distribution, and a reduction in pore size and percolation diameter with increased microparticle addition, although these values did not fall below those reported as necessary for cell invasion. The protein distribution within the microparticles, near the surface or more deeply located within the microparticles, was important in determining the release profile and effect of crosslinking, as the surface was affected by the carbodiimide crosslinking reaction applied to the scaffold. Crosslinking of microparticles with a high proportion of protein at the surface caused both a reduction and delay in protein release. Protein located within the bulk of the microparticles, was protected from the crosslinking reaction and no delay in the overall release profile was seen.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen
dc.subjectcollagen scaffoldsen
dc.subjectPLGA microparticlesen
dc.subjectFITC-BSAen
dc.subjectEDC crosslinkingen
dc.subjectpore sizeen
dc.subjectpercolation diameteren
dc.titleTargeted protein delivery: carbodiimide crosslinking influences protein release from microparticles incorporated within collagen scaffoldsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1093/rb/rbz015
dc.funderOther external funder (please detail below)en
dc.projectidGrant 320598 3D-Een
dc.cclicenceCC-BY-NCen
dc.date.acceptance2019-03-11
dc.researchinstituteLeicester Institute for Pharmaceutical Innovation - From Molecules to Practice (LIPI)en
dc.funder.otherEuropean Research Councilen


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