Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMehler, David M. A.en
dc.contributor.authorSokunbi, M.O.en
dc.contributor.authorHabes, I.en
dc.contributor.authorBarawi, K.en
dc.contributor.authorSubramanian, L.en
dc.contributor.authorRange, M.en
dc.contributor.authorEvans, J.en
dc.contributor.authorHood, K.en
dc.contributor.authorLührs, M.en
dc.contributor.authorKeedwell, P.en
dc.contributor.authorGoebel, R.en
dc.contributor.authorLinden, D.E.J.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-30T14:06:32Z
dc.date.available2018-08-30T14:06:32Z
dc.date.issued2018-06-23
dc.identifier.citationMehler, D.M.A. et al. (2018) Targeting the affective brain-a randomized controlled trial of real-time fMRI neurofeedback in patients with depression. Neuropsychopharmacology,en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2086/16524
dc.descriptionopen access articleen
dc.description.abstractFunctional magnetic resonance imaging neurofeedback (fMRI-NF) training of areas involved in emotion processing can reduce depressive symptoms by over 40% on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS). However, it remains unclear if this efficacy is specific to feedback from emotion-regulating regions. We tested in a single-blind, randomized, controlled trial if upregulation of emotion areas (NFE) yields superior efficacy compared to upregulation of a control region activated by visual scenes (NFS). Forty-three moderately to severely depressed medicated patients were randomly assigned to five sessions augmentation treatment of either NFE or NFS training. At primary outcome (week 12) no significant group mean HDRS difference was found (B = −0.415 [95% CI −4.847 to 4.016], p = 0.848) for the 32 completers (16 per group). However, across groups depressive symptoms decreased by 43%, and 38% of patients remitted. These improvements lasted until follow-up (week 18). Both groups upregulated target regions to a similar extent. Further, clinical improvement was correlated with an increase in self-efficacy scores. However, the interpretation of clinical improvements remains limited due to lack of a sham-control group. We thus surveyed effects reported for accepted augmentation therapies in depression. Data indicated that our findings exceed expected regression to the mean and placebo effects that have been reported for drug trials and other sham-controlled high-technology interventions. Taken together, we suggest that the experience of successful self-regulation during fMRI-NF training may be therapeutic. We conclude that if fMRI-NF is effective for depression, self-regulation training of higher visual areas may provide an effective alternative.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNatureen
dc.titleTargeting the affective brain-a randomized controlled trial of real-time fMRI neurofeedback in patients with depression.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41386-018-0126-5
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.funderMedical Research Council (UK) grant G 1100629; National Institute for Social Care and Health Research (HS/10/25); Health and Care Research Wales (HS/14/20); European Commission 7th Framework Programme (no 602186); Health & Care Research Wales and Cancer Research UK.en
dc.projectidG 1100629; HS/10/25; HS/14/20; no 602186en
dc.cclicenceCC-BY-NCen
dc.date.acceptance2018-06-12en
dc.researchinstituteInstitute for Allied Health Sciences Researchen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record