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dc.contributor.authorRichardson, Joannaen
dc.contributor.authorCodona, J.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-21T11:33:13Z
dc.date.available2017-11-21T11:33:13Z
dc.date.issued2018-02-01
dc.identifier.citationRichardson, J. and Codona, J. (2018) Blame and Fear: Roma in the UK in a Changing Europe. Journal of Poverty and Social Justice, 26 (1), pp. 95-112en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2086/14886
dc.descriptionThe file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.en
dc.description.abstractAnti-Gypsyism is not a new phenomenon. For centuries Roma have been blamed and feared; their social identities constructed to fulfil a function to be the visible ‘other’. The Brexit debate offered fertile, but well-trodden, ground for negative discourse. Whilst the impact of the debate was perceived as hostile by GTR, there was a further effect of GTR embodying three key gripping anti-EU arguments: sovereignty of policy making, immigration control and potential cost savings of withdrawing from the EU. The research shows the felt hostility by GTR and suggests that the successful performance of the social construction of Roma in the debate was vital to the hegemonic, anti-EU, fear and blame discourse of Brexit.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPolicy Pressen
dc.subjectRomaen
dc.subjectGypsyen
dc.subjectTravelleren
dc.subjectBrexiten
dc.subjectFearen
dc.titleBlame and fear:Roma in the UK in a changing Europeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1332/175982717x15127350591914
dc.researchgroupCentre for Comparative Housing Researchen
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.funderN/Aen
dc.projectidN/Aen
dc.cclicenceCC-BY-NCen
dc.date.acceptance2017-11-20en
dc.researchinstituteLocal Governance Research Centre (LGRC)en
dc.researchinstituteCentre for Urban Research on Austerity (CURA)en


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