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dc.contributor.authorJolley, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorMoreland, Neilen
dc.contributor.authorRead, Kateen
dc.contributor.authorKaur, Harjinderen
dc.contributor.authorJutlla, Karanen
dc.contributor.authorClark, Michaelen
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-21T10:04:06Z
dc.date.available2017-04-21T10:04:06Z
dc.date.issued2009-12
dc.identifier.citationJolley, D., Moreland, N., Read, K., Kaur, H., Jutlla, K. and Clark, M. (2009).The ‘Twice a Child’ Projects: learning about dementia and related disorders within the black and minority ethnic population of an English city and improving relevant services. Journal of Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care. 2 (4), pp. 4-9.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2086/14078
dc.description.abstractDementia is found in all races. Within the UK, elders in black and minority ethnic (BME) communities are often unable or unwilling to access services that might help them when they develop dementia. A series of research-based studies in Wolverhampton have demonstrated that working with community leaders and family carers can identify strengths as well as areas for development in service arrangements. Some areas for development are those shared by all individuals and families with dementia, while others are specific to the cultural group. Areas for action include: the lack of understanding of the normal and pathological features of ageing; fear and stigma associated with mental disorders within BME communities; lack of knowledge of dementia; and insensitivity and inflexibility within some components of services. Knowledge gained from a collaborative review of the situation can be used to plan and deliver iterative improvements. The most effective single initiative is the appointment of a link nurse competent in language, culture and clinical skills. Despite progress over a 10 year period, difficulties remain and there is more to be learned. The research reported here has been conducted over a period of nine years with the city of Wolverhampton. The research has been co-ordinated from for dementia plus (previously Dementia Plus), which has functioned as the Dementia Development Centre for the West Midlands since 2000.en
dc.publisherEthnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Careen
dc.titleThe ‘Twice a Child’ projects: learning about dementia and related disorders within the black and minority ethnic population of an English city and improving relevant servicesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1108/17570980200900024
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.funderN/Aen
dc.projectidN/Aen
dc.cclicenceN/Aen


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