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dc.contributor.authorLin, B.en
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Minshengen
dc.contributor.authorFarukh, Farukhen
dc.contributor.authorRoy, Anishen
dc.contributor.authorSilberschmidt, Vadim V.en
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Liguoen
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-09T15:10:49Z
dc.date.available2016-11-09T15:10:49Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationLin, B. et al. (2016) Modelling plastic deformation in a single-crystal nickel-based superalloy using discrete dislocation dynamics. Mechanics of Advanced Materials and Modern Processes, In Pressen
dc.identifier.issn2198-7874
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2086/12790
dc.description.abstractBackground: Nickel-based superalloys are usually exposed to high static or cyclic loads in non-ambient environment, so a reliable prediction of their mechanical properties, especially plastic deformation, at elevated temperature is essential for improved damage-tolerance assessment of components. Methods: In this paper, plastic deformation in a single-crystal nickel-based superalloy CMSX4 at elevated temperature was modelled using discrete dislocation dynamics (DDD). The DDD approach was implemented using a representative volume element with explicitly-introduced precipitate and periodic boundary condition. The DDD model was calibrated using stress-strain response predicted by a crystal plasticity model, validated against tensile and cyclic tests at 850°C for <001> and <111> crystallographic orientations, at a strain rate of 1/s. Results: The DDD model was capable to capture the global stress-strain response of the material under both monotonic and cyclic loading conditions. Considerably higher dislocation density was obtained for the <111> orientation, indicating more plastic deformation and much lower flow stress in the material, when compared to that for <001> orientation. Dislocation lines looped around the precipitate, and most dislocations were deposited on the surface of precipitate, forming a network of dislocation lines. Simple unloading resulted in a reduction of dislocation density. Conclusions: Plastic deformation in metallic materials is closely related to dynamics of dislocations, and the DDD approach can provide a more fundamental understanding of crystal plasticity and the evolution of heterogeneous dislocation networks, which is useful when considering such issues as the onset of damage in the material during plastic deformation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.subjectDiscrete dislocation dynamicsen
dc.subjectRepresentative volume elementen
dc.subjectCrystal plasticityen
dc.subjectMonotonic loadingen
dc.subjectCyclic deformationen
dc.titleModelling plastic deformation in a single-crystal nickel-based superalloy using discrete dislocation dynamicsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s40759-016-0012-y
dc.researchgroupEngineering and Physical Sciences Institute (EPsi)
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.funderThe work was funded by the EPSRC (Grants EP/K026844/1 and EP/M000966/1) of the UK. The crystal plasticity UMAT was originally developed and calibrated against the experimental data by Professor Esteban Busso, Professor Noel O’Dowd and their associates while they were with the Imperial College, London. The research leading to these results also received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement No. PIRSES-GA-2013-610547 TAMER.en
dc.funderEPSRC (Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council)en
dc.projectidEP/K026844/1en
dc.projectidEP/M000966/1en
dc.cclicenceN/Aen
dc.date.acceptance2016-10-08en
dc.exception.reasonOn Loughborough repository https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/dspace-jspui/handle/2134/23064en


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