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dc.contributor.authorDiao, K.en
dc.contributor.authorSweetapple, Chrisen
dc.contributor.authorFarmani, Raziyehen
dc.contributor.authorFu, Guangtaoen
dc.contributor.authorWard, Sarahen
dc.contributor.authorButler, Daviden
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-03T11:02:18Z
dc.date.available2016-11-03T11:02:18Z
dc.date.issued2016-10-04
dc.identifier.citationDiao, K., Sweetapple, C., Farmani, R., Fu, G., Ward, S. and Butler, D. (2016) Global resilience analysis of water distribution systems. Water Research, 106, pp. 383-393en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2086/12765
dc.description.abstractEvaluating and enhancing resilience in water infrastructure is a crucial step towards more sustainable urban water management. As a prerequisite to enhancing resilience, a detailed understanding is required of the inherent resilience of the underlying system. Differing from traditional risk analysis, here we propose a global resilience analysis (GRA) approach that shifts the objective from analysing multiple and unknown threats to analysing the more identifiable and measurable system responses to extreme conditions, i.e. potential failure modes. GRA aims to evaluate a system's resilience to a possible failure mode regardless of the causal threat(s) (known or unknown, external or internal). The method is applied to test the resilience of four water distribution systems (WDSs) with various features to three typical failure modes (pipe failure, excess demand, and substance intrusion). The study reveals GRA provides an overview of a water system's resilience to various failure modes. For each failure mode, it identifies the range of corresponding failure impacts and reveals extreme scenarios (e.g. the complete loss of water supply with only 5% pipe failure, or still meeting 80% of demand despite over 70% of pipes failing). GRA is also able to illustrate the similarities or differences in responses of different systems to various failure modes. Moreover, GRA reveals that increased resilience to one failure mode may decrease resilience to another and the same fraction of component failure could result in tremendously different level of failure impacts. The method can be used as a comprehensive diagnostic framework to evaluate a range of interventions for improving system resilience in future studies.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.subjectexcess demanden
dc.subjectfailure modeen
dc.subjectglobal resilience analysisen
dc.subjectpipe failureen
dc.subjectsubstance intrusionen
dc.subjectwater distribution systemen
dc.titleGlobal resilience analysis of water distribution systemsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2016.10.011
dc.researchgroupEngineering and Physical Sciences Institute (EPsi)
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.funderEPSRC (Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council)en
dc.projectidEP/ K006924/1en
dc.cclicenceCC BYen
dc.date.acceptance2016-10-03en
dc.exception.reasonopen access articleen
dc.researchinstituteInstitute of Energy and Sustainable Development (IESD)en


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