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dc.contributor.authorBaldwin, Lucyen
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-09T08:32:43Z
dc.date.available2015-07-09T08:32:43Z
dc.date.issued2015-05-09
dc.identifier.citationBaldwin L. (2015) What is the Purpose of Punishment. Criminal Law and Justice Weekly. 179 (17) pp. 336-337en
dc.identifier.otherhttp://www.criminallawandjustice.co.uk/Type/Comment
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2086/11067
dc.description.abstractThis article seeks to explore the political climate and its relationship with attitudes to punishment and perception of what actually constitutes punishment . It s a comment piece asking for a critical review of sentencing practice- particularly in relation to short sentences for non violent offences. The article suggests that courts need be mindful that when considering a custodial sentence there is a bar of consideration that the offence must be 'so serious' as so warrant a custodial sentence. Given that 84% of women and 71% of men are serving relatively short sentences for non violent offences - this suggests this mindfulness is often absent . 'Short sentences' which are often too short for any offending behaviour work to take place and as a result of which lives are disupted , sometimes irrepairably - raising the question of the purpose of a custodial sentence.- is to rehabilitate or simply to punish.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLexisNexisen
dc.subjectsentencingen
dc.subjectpunishmenten
dc.subjectserious risk of harmen
dc.subjectnon custodial sentenceen
dc.subjectatttitudes to punishmenten
dc.titleWhat is the Purpose of Punishmenten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.peerreviewedNoen
dc.funderN/Aen
dc.projectidN/Aen
dc.researchinstituteInstitute for Research in Criminology, Community, Education and Social Justiceen


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