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dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Jeanen
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-06T15:54:53Z
dc.date.available2014-10-06T15:54:53Z
dc.date.issued2014-10-31
dc.identifier.citationWilliams, J. (2014) Women’s Football During World War One. In: The National Football Museum (eds.) The Greater Game: A History of Football in World War One. Oxford: Shire Publications and National Football Museum, pp. 45-47en
dc.identifier.isbn9781784420369
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2086/10312
dc.description.abstractPrior to the World War One, women’s football had a rocky existence. The earliest organised game seems to have taken place on 9 May 1881 when a team calling themselves England played a side named Scotland at Easter Road, Edinburgh. Scotland won 3-0. A London-based team, the British Ladies Football Club (BLFC), was founded in 1895. The BLFC also played in Scotland and the north-east but it only lasted two years. However, women’s football grew rapidly between 1917 and 1922 in Britain largely as a result of the changing status of women in society and new opportunities for a more varied range of work, with attendant higher pay and a right to leisure.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherShire Publications Ltden
dc.subjectwomenen
dc.subjectAssociation footballen
dc.subjectmunitionsen
dc.subjectWorld War Oneen
dc.titleWomen’s Football During World War Oneen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.researchgroupInternational Centre for Sports History and Cultureen
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.fundernoneen
dc.projectidnoneen


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