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dc.contributor.authorDavies, Jonathan S.en
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-30T10:53:56Z
dc.date.available2014-09-30T10:53:56Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationDavies, J.S. (2014) Coercive Cities: Reflections on the Dark Side of Urban Power in the 21st Century. Journal of Urban Affairs. 36 (S2), pp. 590-599en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2086/10301
dc.description.abstractUrban theory has largely overlooked the continuing centrality of coercion in the governance of cities. The paper argues that urban research should take everyday coercion far more seriously in the next decade than it did in the previous two. It highlights seven key research questions: what kinds of coercive power do cities have at their disposal? In what ways are cities terrains of coercion? Who are the agents of coercion? Who are its subjects? What are the configurations of coercive and non-coercive power in cities? When is coercion legitimate? And, what are the implications of enduring coercion for our understandings of urban change? The paper concludes that a better appreciation of coercive cities is essential for an adequate understanding of urban power in the 21st century.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjecturbanen
dc.subjectpoweren
dc.subjectcoercion, citiesen
dc.titleCoercive Cities: Reflections on the Dark Side of Urban Power in the 21st Centuryen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/juaf.12147
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.fundernoneen
dc.projectidnoneen
dc.researchinstituteLocal Governance Research Centre (LGRC)en
dc.researchinstituteCentre for Urban Research on Austerity (CURA)en


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