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dc.contributor.authorWilson, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorCaulfield, Lauraen
dc.contributor.authorAtherton, Susieen
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-08T14:01:52Z
dc.date.available2014-07-08T14:01:52Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationWilson, D., Caulfield, L. and Atherton, S. (2009) Good Vibrations: The long term impact of a prison based music project. Prison Service Journal, 182, pp. 27-32en
dc.identifier.issn0300-3558
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2086/10092
dc.description.abstractThere is growing awareness amongst policy makers and those working in the criminal justice system of the contribution that can be made by the arts in prisons, in particular by more innovative projects that are often provided by charities and voluntary organisations. Numerous research studies have suggested that projects — such as music and art programmes — that offer participants a creative outlet have a positive impact on offenders, not least by encouraging them to engage with further learning and education. The need to consider fully the long- term impact of such projects has been highlighted in reports commissioned by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport, Department for Education and Skills, and the Arts Council England1, which further suggest that research that tracks participants over time is the most appropriate way to assess the real impact of projects in prison.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPrison Service Journalen
dc.subjectprisonen
dc.subjectartsen
dc.subjectrehabilitationen
dc.subjectgamelanen
dc.titleGood Vibrations: The long term impact of a prison based music projecten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.researchgroupCriminal Justice, Policy and Practiceen
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.funderGood Vibrationsen
dc.projectid3en


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