Tranquility and Brutality: The Paradox of Partition Violence in Punjab

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dc.contributor.author Virdee, Pippa en
dc.date.accessioned 2012-09-07T08:17:16Z
dc.date.available 2012-09-07T08:17:16Z
dc.date.issued 2006
dc.identifier.citation Virdee, P. (2006) Tranquility and Brutality: The Paradox of Partition Violence in Punjab. The Historian, 4, (1) en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2086/7123
dc.description.abstract Following the decision to partition the Punjab, the region was swept by the most horrific communal carnage that India had ever seen. For many it was the sheer scope and magnitude of the events that has left such a haunting memory. The crimes were gruesome and, while they had elements of spontaneity, there were clear signs of organisation too. In addition to ‘outsider’ violence, some male family members killed their wives and daughters to save them from the ‘dishonour’ of rape. Others committed suicide to save themselves from either being slaughtered or being converted to the other’s faith. This was violence against humanity of unspeakable magnitude; it was barbaric and sadistic and it was being perpetrated against former friends and neighbours. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Department of History, GC University, Lahore en
dc.subject partition en
dc.subject Punjab en
dc.subject Malerkotla en
dc.subject violence en
dc.title Tranquility and Brutality: The Paradox of Partition Violence in Punjab en
dc.type Article en


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