Mixing Business with Leisure? The Football Club Doctor, Sports Medicine and the Voluntary Tradition

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dc.contributor.author Carter, Neil en
dc.date.accessioned 2012-07-16T09:16:03Z
dc.date.available 2012-07-16T09:16:03Z
dc.date.issued 2009-03
dc.identifier.citation Carter, N. (2009) Mixing Business with Leisure? The Football Club Doctor, Sports Medicine and the Voluntary Tradition. Sport in History, 29 (1), pp. 69-91 en
dc.identifier.issn 1746-0263
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2086/6375
dc.description.abstract The football club doctor has traditionally been a role fulfilled by a local general practitioner on a casual basis over a long period. Since the 1990s, due to football’s accelerated commercialization, a number of clubs have appointed full-time doctors with specialist sports medicine knowledge. This article explores the origins and development of this role in its wider social context since the late nineteenth century and argues that initially club doctors were part of a voluntary tradition. In addition, the development of the role has reflected the nature of sports medicine in Britain and more particularly football, as well as highlighting the changing demands and pressures of the job in light of growing commercial demands. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Taylor and Francis en
dc.subject doctors en
dc.subject football en
dc.subject sports medicine en
dc.subject general practitioners en
dc.title Mixing Business with Leisure? The Football Club Doctor, Sports Medicine and the Voluntary Tradition en
dc.type Article en
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17460260902775227
dc.researchgroup International Centre for Sports History and Culture en
dc.peerreviewed Yes en


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