Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDennis-Antwi, Jemima
dc.contributor.authorCulley, Lorraine
dc.contributor.authorHiles, David
dc.contributor.authorDyson, Simon
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-23T09:26:39Z
dc.date.available2011-08-23T09:26:39Z
dc.date.issued2011-08
dc.identifier.citationDennis-Antwi, J.A., Culley, L., Hiles, D. and Dyson, S.M. (2011) “I can die today, I can die tomorrow”: Lay perceptions of sickle cell disease in Kumasi, Ghana at a point of transition. Ethnicity and Health, 16 (4-5) pp. 465-481.en
dc.identifier.issn1355-7858
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2086/5174
dc.descriptionOpen Access Article can be found by following the DOIen
dc.description.abstractObjective. To describe the lay meanings of sickle cell disease (SCD) in the Ashanti region of Ghana. Design. Depth interviews with 31 fathers of people with SCD; a focus group with health professionals associated with the newborn sickle cell screening programme, and a focus group with mothers of children with SCD. Results. Whilst there are discourses that associate sickle cell with early or recurrent death, with supernatural undermining of family well-being, and with economic challenges in purchasing medical care, other discourses that value children and other family practices that resist stigma are also in evidence. Conclusion. Lay perspectives on SCD are constructed in the contexts of enduring culture (the high value placed on children); changing culture (medicine and research as available alternative discourses to supernatural ones); altered material circumstances (newborn screening producing cohorts of children with SCD); changing political situations (insurance-based treatment); enhanced family resources (the experience of a cohort of young people with SCD). Above all the praxis of successfully caring for a child with SCD, and the political experience of sharing that praxis, stands in opposition to discourses of death and helps parents resist stigma and despair.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen
dc.subjectsickle cellen
dc.subjectlay perspectivesen
dc.subjectsociology of healthen
dc.subjectGhanaen
dc.subjectAshantien
dc.subjectAfricaen
dc.title“I can die today, I can die tomorrow”: Lay perceptions of sickle cell disease in Kumasi, Ghana at a point of transition.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13557858.2010.531249
dc.researchgroupUnit for the Social Study of Thalassaemia and Sickle Cellen
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.researchinstituteInstitute for Allied Health Sciences Researchen
dc.researchinstituteCentre for Reproduction Research (CRR)en


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record