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dc.contributor.authorMosscrop, Maxen
dc.contributor.authorGillam, A. M.en
dc.date.accessioned2008-12-11T13:17:48Z
dc.date.available2008-12-11T13:17:48Z
dc.date.issued2004-11-18en
dc.identifier.citationMOSSCROP, M.L. 18 November - 06 December 2004. Pleasure. London: APT Gallery. 26 July - 03 August 2003. Pleasure. Ramsgate:IOTA Gallery.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2086/464
dc.descriptionThe research investigated the role of pleasure in contemporary art practice. The project resulted in two exhibitions and a journal article. The research investigated the practices of nine contemporary artists working in diverse fine art media. It asked how pleasure acts as a mobilising force and influence in these artists’ processes, and how it is illuminated and embodied in the works produced. The curatorial process involved visits to artists’ studios, discussing, interrogating and documenting working processes, and selecting works. The journal article explored the artists’ works, alongside Canaletto’s painting of the Vauxhall Pleasure Gardens, drawing on the philosophies of Jeremy Bentham, Michel Foucault and Michel Serres. The process of curation and preparation of the article was funded by an AHRB Small Grants in the Creative Arts. Arts Council England funded the commissioning, transport and installation of new works from the artists. The exhibition 'Doubtful Pleasures' took place at APT Gallery, an important exhibiting space for contemporary art in central London. Exhibitions proposals are competitive, selected by a committee of recognised Artists and Academics. My 3,200 word article 'Doubtful Pleasures' was published in issue 5 of 'Miser & Now', the issue prompted by my research, dedicated to the theme of pleasure, and including 15 other commissioned articles. The exhibition 'With Pleasure' included 2 large scale sculptures from the 'Travesty' series. The exhibition 'Doubtful Pleasures' included my sculptural video work 'The Visit', consisting of a model of a room rotating around a 5m diameter circle in a dimly lit space, passing a static video camera feeding a live image to a monitor. The video event produced acts as a brief moment of consummation within an extended duration of expectation and memory, provoking reflection on the nature of pleasure as a transient sensation, connected to desire and remembering.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectRAE 2008
dc.subjectUoA 63 Art and Design
dc.titlePleasure curation, organisation and participation in 2 group exhibitions, and accompanying journal article in 'Miser and now'en
dc.typeOtheren
dc.researchgroupFine Art Practices


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