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dc.contributor.authorMcBride, Neil
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-17T11:42:20Z
dc.date.available2020-02-17T11:42:20Z
dc.date.issued2020-02-11
dc.identifier.citationMcBride,N. (2020) Developing Socially-Inspired Robotics through the Application of Human Analogy: Capabilities and Social Practice AI and Societyen
dc.identifier.issn0951-5666
dc.identifier.urihttps://dora.dmu.ac.uk/handle/2086/19190
dc.descriptionThe file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.en
dc.description.abstractSocially-inspired robotics involves drawing on the observation and study of human social interactions in order to apply them to the design of sociable robots. As there is increasing expectation that robots may participate in social care and provide some relief for the increasing shortage of human care workers, social interaction with robots becomes of increasing importance. This paper demonstrates the potential of socially-inspired robotics through the exploration of a case study of the interaction of a partially-sighted social worker with a support worker. This is framed within the Capability Approach in which the interaction of a human and a sociable robot is understood as resulting in a collaborative capability which is grounded the relationship between the human and the robot rather than the autonomous capabilities of the robot. The implications of applying the case study as an analogy for human-robot interaction are expressed through a discussion of capabilities and social practice and policy. The study is attenuated by a discussion of the technical limits of robots and the extensive complexity of the social context in which it is envisaged sociable robots may be employed.en
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.subjectSociable robotsen
dc.subjectcapability approachen
dc.subjecttrusting robotsen
dc.subjectsocially inspired roboticsen
dc.titleDeveloping Socially-Inspired Robotics through the Application of Human Analogy: Capabilities and Social Practiceen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s00146-020-00948-6
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.funderNo external funderen
dc.cclicenceCC-BY-NCen
dc.date.acceptance2020-01-22
dc.researchinstituteCentre for Computing and Social Responsibility (CCSR)en


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