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dc.contributor.authorBlair, Alasdair
dc.contributor.authorStockemer, Daniel
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-10T10:31:55Z
dc.date.available2019-12-10T10:31:55Z
dc.date.issued2019-10-18
dc.identifier.citationBlair, A. and Stockemer, D. (2019) European Political Science,en
dc.identifier.issn1680-4333
dc.identifier.issn1682-0983
dc.identifier.urihttps://dora.dmu.ac.uk/handle/2086/18926
dc.description.abstractOne of the most important challenges facing Political Science Faculty is the way in which the curriculum engages with, and responds to, the populist tide that has spread across a significant number of countries in recent decades. Over recent years there has been an increased level of research activity that has sought to explain the factors for the rise in populism. Yet less attention has been focused on the way in which the political science curriculum could, or should, respond to this change. This article provides an introductory landscape that sets out these challenges and identifies the contextual background for the three articles which comprise this symposium.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.subjectPopulismen
dc.subjectPolitics curriculumen
dc.subjectIdentity politicsen
dc.subjectPedagogyen
dc.titleTeaching politics in an era of Trumpen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1057/s41304-019-00222-4
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.funderNo external funderen
dc.cclicenceCC-BY-NCen
dc.date.acceptance2019-09-05


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