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dc.contributor.authorBanerjee, Subeen
dc.contributor.authorFarina, N.en
dc.contributor.authorDaley, S.en
dc.contributor.authorGrosvenor, W.en
dc.contributor.authorHughes, L.en
dc.contributor.authorHebditch, M.en
dc.contributor.authorMackrell, S.en
dc.contributor.authorNilforooshan, R.en
dc.contributor.authorWyatt, C.en
dc.contributor.authorde Vries, Kayen
dc.contributor.authorHaq, I.en
dc.contributor.authorWright, J.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-06T11:09:54Z
dc.date.available2018-11-06T11:09:54Z
dc.date.issued2016-10-10
dc.identifier.citationBanerjee, S., Farina, N., Daley, S., Grosvenor, W., Hughes, L., Hebditch, M., Mackrell, S., Nilforooshan, R., Wyatt, C., de Vries, K., Haq, I., Wright, J. (2016) How do we enhance undergraduate healthcare education in dementia? A review of the role of innovative approaches and development of the Time for Dementia Programme. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 32(1), pp.68–75.en
dc.identifier.issn1099-1166
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2086/17068
dc.descriptionThe file attached to this record is the author's final version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link. Open access articleen
dc.description.abstractTraditional healthcare education, delivered through a series of time-limited clinical placements, often fails to deliver an understanding of the experiences of those with long-term conditions, a growing issue for healthcare systems. Responses include longitudinal integrated clerkships and senior mentor programmes allowing students’ longer placements, continuity of contact and opportunities to learn about chronic illness and patient experience. We review their development and delivery in dementia and present the Time for Dementia (TFD) Programme, a novel 2-year interdisciplinary educational programme. Design: The study design involves a scoping review of enhanced placements in dementia for healthcare professionals in training including longitudinal integrated clerkships and senior mentor programmes and a case study of the development of TFD and its evaluation. Results: Eight enhanced programmes in dementia were identified and seven in the USA. None were compulsory and all lasted 12 months. All reported positive impact from case study designs but data quality was weak. Building on these, TFD was developed in partnership between the Alzheimer’s Society, universities and NHS and made a core part of the curriculum for medical, nursing and paramedic students. Students visit a person with dementia and their family in pairs for 2 h every 3 months for 2 years. They follow a semi-structured interaction guide focusing on experiences of illness and services and complete reflective appraisals. Conclusions: We need interprofessional undergraduate healthcare education that enables future healthcare professionals to be able to understand and manage the people with the long-term conditions who current systems often fail. TFD is designed to help address this need.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.subjecthealthcare educationen
dc.subjectdementiaen
dc.subjectAlzheimer’s diseaseen
dc.subjectlongitudinal integrated clerkshipen
dc.subjectsenior mentorshipen
dc.titleHow do we enhance undergraduate healthcare education in dementia? A review of the role of innovative approaches and development of the Time for Dementia programme.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1002/gps.4602
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.funderHealth Education England—Kent, Surrey, Surrey & Sussexen
dc.projectidN/Aen
dc.cclicenceCC-BY-NCen
dc.date.acceptance2016-09-15en
dc.researchinstituteInstitute of Health, Health Policy and Social Careen
dc.exception.ref2021codes254aen


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