Health communication and adolescents: What do their emails tell us?

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dc.contributor.author Brown, Brian J.
dc.contributor.author Harvey, K. J.
dc.contributor.author Churchill, Richard
dc.contributor.author Crawford, Paul
dc.contributor.author Mullany, Louise
dc.contributor.author McFarlane, Aidan
dc.contributor.author McPherson, Ann
dc.date.accessioned 2009-04-15T16:26:02Z
dc.date.available 2009-04-15T16:26:02Z
dc.date.issued 2008
dc.identifier.citation Brown, B.J. et al (2008) Health communication and adolescents: What do their emails tell us? Family Practice, 25, pp.304-311. en
dc.identifier.issn 0263-2136
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2086/1692
dc.description This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Family Practice following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version Brown, B.J. et al (2008) Health communication and adolescents: What do their emails tell us? Family Practice, 25, pp.304-311. is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/fampra/cmn029
dc.description.abstract Background. It is widely known that barriers exist in communication between adolescents and health professionals. However, little is known about the actual language used by young people articulating such difficulties and whether email might allow them to overcome these problems. Objectives. The aims of this study were to investigate concerns and difficulties relating to communication among adolescents seeking online health advice. Methods. The study design was a corpus linguistic analysis of a million-word adolescent health email database based on 62 794 emails from young people requesting health advice from a prominent UK-hosted and doctor-led website. Results. Young people reported various concerns about their health. They described numerous difficulties in disclosing such concerns to other people, in particular to parents and doctors. However, they readily expressed their concerns by email, displaying elevated levels of directness, particularly in relation to potentially sensitive or embarrassing topics. Conclusion. Email has the potential to facilitate and supplement face-to-face consultations with health professionals. Increased adoption of email by health providers may be an efficient means of engaging with a generation often reluctant to access more traditional health care services and thus encourage them to enter the primary care setting more readily. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Oxford University Press en
dc.subject adolescents en
dc.subject communication en
dc.subject corpus linguistics en
dc.subject doctor-patient communication en
dc.subject email en
dc.subject internet en
dc.subject primary care en
dc.title Health communication and adolescents: What do their emails tell us? en
dc.type Article en
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/fampra/cmn029
dc.researchgroup Participation & Social Justice
dc.researchgroup Psychology
dc.researchgroup Health Policy
dc.researchgroup Mary Seacole Research Centre
dc.researchgroup Health Policy Research Unit


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