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dc.contributor.authorRobson, Jeremyen
dc.contributor.authorSmith, H.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-11T14:19:53Z
dc.date.available2018-10-11T14:19:53Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationRobson, J. and Smith, H. (2019) Can we have faith jurors listen without prejudice? Likely sources of inaccuracy in voice comparison exercises. Criminal Law Review, , 2, pp.115-130en
dc.identifier.issn0011-135X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2086/16724
dc.descriptionThe file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version.en
dc.description.abstractThis paper reviews the current law in respect of whether juries may permitted to listen to recordings of a suspect's voice with a view to undertaking an identification. It discusses the factors which impact upon the accuracy of the process and suggests procedural amendments to reduce the risk of misidentification taking place.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSweet and Maxwellen
dc.subjectCriminal evidenceen
dc.subjectLawen
dc.subjectIdentification evidenceen
dc.subjectVoice recognitionen
dc.titleCan we have faith jurors listen without prejudice? Likely sources of inaccuracy in voice comparison exercises.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.researchgroupInstitute for Evidence-based Law Reformen
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.funderN/Aen
dc.projectidN/Aen
dc.cclicenceCC-BY-NCen
dc.date.acceptance2018-10-03en
dc.researchinstituteInstitute for Evidence-Based Law Reform (IELR)en


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