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dc.contributor.authorCartwright, Edwarden
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-30T12:23:58Z
dc.date.available2018-08-30T12:23:58Z
dc.date.issued2018-08-21
dc.identifier.citationCartwright, E. (2018) Guilt Aversion and Reciprocity in the Performance-Enhancing Drug Game. Journal of Sports Economics, 20 (4), pp. 535-555en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2086/16515
dc.descriptionThe file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.en
dc.description.abstractWe revisit the performance-enhancing drug game by applying models of guilt aversion and reciprocity. Both models fit within the framework of psychological game theory in that they allow payoffs to depend on beliefs. We explore the extent to which social norms can help reduce or eliminate doping in sport. With reciprocity, we see that first-order beliefs on the prevalence of doping are key and a norm of clean sport would require a coordinated shift in such beliefs. With guilt aversion, by contrast, second-order beliefs are key and individuals may have an incentive to race clean even if they expect competitors will dope. Our results point to the importance for sports bodies and coaches to manage the beliefs of athletes.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherSAGEen
dc.subjectdopingen
dc.subjectguilt aversionen
dc.subjectreciprocityen
dc.subjectperformance enhancing drugsen
dc.subjectinequality aversionen
dc.titleGuilt Aversion and Reciprocity in the Performance-Enhancing Drug Gameen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1527002518794793
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.funderN/Aen
dc.projectidN/Aen
dc.cclicenceCC-BY-NCen
dc.date.acceptance2018-06-10en
dc.researchinstituteInstitute for Applied Economics and Social Value (IAESV)en


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