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dc.contributor.authorBerghs, Mariaen
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-12T09:40:49Z
dc.date.available2017-12-12T09:40:49Z
dc.date.issued2018-04-20
dc.identifier.citationBerghs, M. (2018) Ethical (Dis)enchantment, Afflictive Kinship and Ebola Exceptionalism. In: Disability and Everyday Worlds. Thomas, G. & Sakellariou, D. (eds.) New York:Routledge.en
dc.identifier.isbn9781138214217
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2086/15001
dc.description.abstractThis chapter begins with an ethnographic contribution from post-Ebola Sierra Leone, illustrating how in order to understand the differences between impairment, disease, and disability, there is a need to understand ‘ordinary ethics’. I begin by illustrating what this means through the unmaking of ethical practices during the Ebola epidemic in terms of, for example, caring relationships and social obligations of kinship. Secondly, I illustrate how post-Ebola disability as disablement is displayed as afflictive kinship when it is no longer possible to remake ethical life because bonds of kinship do not function. Thirdly, I give two examples of the ways in which a biomedical public reconstruction of social ethics has only led to disability and disablement for people living with consequences of Ebola.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.subjectDisabilityen
dc.subjectSierra Leoneen
dc.subjectEbolaen
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.titleEthical (Dis)enchantment, Afflictive Kinship and Ebola Exceptionalism.en
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.funderN/Aen
dc.projectidN/Aen
dc.cclicenceN/Aen
dc.date.acceptance2017-12-01en
dc.researchinstituteInstitute for Allied Health Sciences Researchen
dc.researchinstituteInstitute of Health, Health Policy and Social Careen


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