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dc.contributor.authorUgur, Mehmeten
dc.contributor.authorTrushin, Eshrefen
dc.contributor.authorSolomon, Ednaen
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-13T08:59:37Z
dc.date.available2017-10-13T08:59:37Z
dc.date.issued2016-05-10
dc.identifier.citationUgur, M., Trushin, E. and Solomon, E. (2016) Inverted-U relationship between R&D intensity and survival: evidence on scale and complementarity effects in UK data. Research Policy, 45 (7), pp. 1474-1492en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2086/14614
dc.descriptionopen access articleen
dc.description.abstractExisting evidence on the relationship between R&D intensity and firm survival is varied and often con-flicting. We argue that this may be due to overlooking R&D scale effects and complementarity betweenR&D intensity and market concentration. Drawing on Schumpeterian models of competition and inno-vation, we address these issues by developing a formal model of firm survival and using a panel datasetof 37,930 of R&D-active UK firms over 1998–2012. We report the following findings: (i) the relationshipbetween R&D intensity and firm survival follows an inverted-U pattern that reflects diminishing scaleeffects; (ii) R&D intensity and market concentration are complements in that R&D-active firms havelonger survival time if they are in more concentrated industries; and (iii) creative destruction as proxiedby median R&D intensity in the industry and the premium on business lending have negative effects onfirm survival. Other findings concerning age, size, productivity, relative growth, Pavitt technology classesand the macroeconomic environment are in line with the existing literature. The results are strongly ormoderately robust to different samples, stepwise estimations, and controls for frailty and left truncation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.subjectR&Den
dc.subjectInnovationen
dc.subjectFirm dynamicsen
dc.subjectSurvival analysisen
dc.titleInverted-U relationship between R&D intensity and survival: evidence on scale and complementarity effects in UK dataen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.respol.2016.04.007
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.funderESRC (Economic and Social Research Council)en
dc.projectidES/K004824/1en
dc.cclicenceCC BYen
dc.date.acceptance2016-04-21en
dc.exception.reasonopen access articleen
dc.researchinstituteInstitute for Applied Economics and Social Value (IAESV)en


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