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dc.contributor.authorAzzenoud, Marouaneen
dc.contributor.authorStuart, Graemeen
dc.contributor.authorBull, R.en
dc.contributor.authorLemon, Marken
dc.contributor.authorPerry, D.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-07T09:31:09Z
dc.date.available2017-06-07T09:31:09Z
dc.date.issued2017-06
dc.identifier.citationAzennoud, M., Stuart, G., Bull, R., Lemon, M., and Perry, D. (2017) Smart Energy Management: How Does the Use of Smart Meters Help in Achieving Energy Savings? Case Studies from Two Local Authorities in the UK. ECEEE Summer Study Conference Proceedings 2017. pp 657-666en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2086/14231
dc.description.abstractThe use of smart meters has increased since the beginning of the 21st century. The UK government, for example, has recently initiated a programme of rolling out 53 million smart electricity and gas meters for homes and small businesses by 2020 with the expectation that €20 billion will be saved on energy bills over the coming 15 years. The UK’s mass deployment of smart meters has resulted in Local Authorities experiencing additional costs from their installation in their non-domestic buildings, including the costs of new data collection and reporting systems. As a consequence, energy managers are increasingly being forced to consider the ideal frequency for collecting and reporting energy data, appropriate methods for processing that data and the need to rely on ‘real-time’ energy data when there are several other ways in which energy data can be accessed (bills, direct readings, etc.). Finally, what are the realistic expectations about the financial savings attributable to the installation of smart meters? This paper seeks to address these questions through two case studies which examine the effects of the smart meter roll-out programme on two separate UK Local Authorities, Northamptonshire County Council and Leicester City Council.en
dc.subjectEnergy Managementen
dc.subjectNon-domestic buildingsen
dc.titleSmart energy management for non-domestic buildings: Case studies of two local authorities in the UKen
dc.typeConferenceen
dc.researchgroupInstitute of Energy and Sustainable Developmenten
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.funderN/Aen
dc.projectidN/Aen
dc.cclicenceCC-BY-NCen
dc.date.acceptance2017-06-01en
dc.researchinstituteInstitute of Energy and Sustainable Development (IESD)en


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