Sickle cell anaemia and deaths in custody in the UK and USA

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dc.contributor.author Dyson, Simon
dc.contributor.author Boswell, Gwyneth
dc.date.accessioned 2008-08-01T10:45:01Z
dc.date.available 2008-08-01T10:45:01Z
dc.date.issued 2006
dc.identifier.citation Dyson, S. and Boswell, G. (2006) Sickle cell anaemia and deaths in custody in the UK and USA. The Howard journal of criminal justice, 45 (1), pp. 14-28. en
dc.identifier.issn 0265-5527
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2086/132
dc.description A world-leading article that anticipated current criminal justice events: This article has been acknowledged by Parks and Crump, a US firm of attorneys representing the family of Martin Lee Anderson, killed by guards at a Florida boot-camp in January 2006, and currently suing for $40m. http://www.nospank.net/anderson.htm
dc.description.abstract An unexplained death in custody represents an important focal point for public scrutiny of the criminal justice system, especially when excess deaths occur in those of minority ethnic descent. Sickle cell anaemia is a serious inherited blood disorder disproportionately affecting minority ethnic groups. Sickle cell trait is the genetic carrier state and not an illness. The evidence suggests that the treatment of sickle cell in the criminal justice system is twofold. Justice authorities have misused sickle cell trait to explain away ten sudden deaths, often associated with forced restraint, of African-Caribbean people in custody. Meanwhile, seven deaths have been attributable to lack of provision of health care for those prisoners suffering from the illness sickle cell anaemia. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Blackwell en
dc.subject sickle cell en
dc.subject custody en
dc.subject sudden death en
dc.subject police en
dc.subject prison en
dc.subject racism en
dc.subject autopsy en
dc.subject coroner en
dc.subject African-Caribbean en
dc.subject African-American en
dc.subject RAE 2008 en
dc.subject UoA 11 Nursing and Midwifery
dc.title Sickle cell anaemia and deaths in custody in the UK and USA en
dc.type Article en
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2311.2006.00401.x
dc.researchgroup Unit for the Social Study of Thalassaemia and Sickle Cell
dc.researchgroup Mary Seacole Research Centre


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