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dc.contributor.authorClarke, Alissaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T14:00:14Z
dc.date.available2016-03-21T14:00:14Z
dc.date.issued2015-12-23
dc.identifier.citationClarke, Alissa (2015) Laughter and Love: Creative Counter-Discourses within Performer Training. Theatre, Dance and Performance Training, 6 (3), pp. 291-306en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2086/11670
dc.descriptionThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in Theatre, Dance and Performance Training on 23/12/2015, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/19443927.2015.1086426en
dc.description.abstractThe importance of being serious and treating the practice seriously is emphasised across many different psychophysical performer trainings, with practitioners following Grotowski’s lead and emphasising the need to ‘Leave all giggling, jokes, social chatter… outside the workspace’ (Slowiak and Cuesta 2007, p. 120). Even where John Britton persuasively argues for the importance of pleasure and fun in the training space, Britton (2010, p. 47) emphasises that ‘this “fun” needs to be intrinsic to the work, not based in the things that surround it (the conversations, socialising, friendships)’. However, drawing on a range of practices, particularly experiences as a participant-observer in Phillip Zarrilli and Sandra Reeve’s trainings, I contend that these private forms of fun should be viewed and utilised as ‘intrinsic to the work’. Aided by Bakhtin’s depiction of the carnivalesque and focusing upon the, as yet, unexamined environment of the performer training changing room and other related daily moments and spaces, I explore participants’ parodic, playful and grotesque treatment of the trainings and their bodies. Frequently sidelined as taboo, these rebellious counter-discourses produce the means for the participant of jokingly questioning and unwrapping the training processes and their evolving bodymind within them. I argue that these discourses not only enable the participant’s independent ownership of their training, but develop a powerful alternative form of group awareness. This group awareness strengthens the individual participant’s independence, and creates a deeply useful presence of love and care within the training space.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen
dc.subjectperformer trainingen
dc.subjectlaughteren
dc.subjectgrotesqueen
dc.subjectBakhtinen
dc.subjectsubversive / counter-discoursesen
dc.subjectPhillip Zarrillien
dc.subjectSandra Reeveen
dc.subjectdramaen
dc.subjectperformanceen
dc.subjectthe bodyen
dc.titleLaughter and Love: Creative Counter-Discourses within Performer Trainingen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19443927.2015.1086426
dc.researchgroupPerformance Research Groupen
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.funderN/Aen
dc.projectidN/Aen
dc.researchinstituteCinema and Television History Institute (CATHI)en
dc.researchinstituteInstitute of Drama, Dance and Performance Studiesen


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