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dc.contributor.authorKnight, Victoriaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T10:21:18Z
dc.date.available2016-03-17T10:21:18Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationKnight, V. (2015) Television, Emotion and Prison Life: Achieving Personal Control. Participations, 12 (1)en
dc.identifier.issn1749-8716
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.participations.org/Volume%2012/Issue%201/3.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2086/11617
dc.description.abstractThis article describes the precarious and sensitive relationship prisoners have with television; it focuses exclusively on the voices of male prisoners to identify how they relate to their viewing experiences within the prison space. This article foregrounds the chief emotional responses prisoners articulated in relation to both prison life and television; boredom, frustration, and happiness. This discussion offers readers an emotive perspective on the ‘pains of imprisonment’ (Sykes 1999). This typology has traditionally underplayed the role of affect. Like other recent prison research this paper calls for a centring of emotion to more fully understand imprisonment. Television plays an important and valuable tool for prisoners’ coping strategies. It is co-opted as a therapeutic tool or ‘protective device’ (Layder 2004:26) to mitigate against the harms of daily life and supply social and psychological nourishment within the prison space.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherParticipations Journalen
dc.subjectTelevisionen
dc.subjectprisoner audiencesen
dc.subjectemotionen
dc.subjectboredomen
dc.subjectpains of imprisonmenten
dc.subjectcontrolen
dc.subjecttherapeuticen
dc.titleTelevision, Emotion and Prison Life: Achieving Personal Controlen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.funderNoneen
dc.projectidNoneen
dc.researchinstituteInstitute for Research in Criminology, Community, Education and Social Justiceen


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